Veterinary Acupuncture on Animals

Acupuncture is an alternative traditional Chinese medication that involves the insertion and manipulation of needles into different points on the body in order to ease pain and discomfort. Many speculates that this alternative treatment simply works or seem effective on patients due to the placebo effect. Placebo effect refers to the concept of just thinking that the treatment is effective so a patient feels comfort, simply put is a mind over matter way of perception to relieve pain. However, this Acupuncture is nowadays not only used on humans but also on animals. Veterinarians are now also executing acupuncture sessions and treatments on animals which has been producing satisfying if not excellent results. So perhaps, acupuncture is not merely a placebo-kind-of-treatment as it apparently worked on animal treatments.

The first concern in performing acupuncture is if the process could be painful to and for the animals since it involves piercing the body with filiform needles. In actuality, human patients who have undergone acupuncture session may attest that this alternative treatment involves no major pain, but have accounted warmth and tingles instead. Whereas on animals, majority of them fell asleep during the process. And when the animals see their veterinary acupuncturist is approaching them, they acknowledge happily as a sign that they trust the vet and the medications performed on them by the animal doctors does not hurt them. However, there I still a minute number on animals that are not comfortable with the process, the same as with some humans.

Like in human acupuncture, the animals used on animals are sterilized and are intended only for single usage. These needles measure from 0.18-0.25 millimeters wide. It is known that 95% of animal patients pricked with these needles feel comfortable especially with the presence of owners or handlers reassuring them. Most animals feel relaxed especially if the acupuncture I executed within the patient’s home as it reduces the animal’ fear of the treatment. This alternative medication is safe and must be performed by eligible practitioners or competent veterinary surgeons.

This process of inserting small needles into the animal bodies are effective treatments for many respiratory and heart conditions ranging from arthritis to skin allergies in different areas of the body. The modified combination of conventional medicine and Chinese acupuncture on animals may considerably improve infections, allergies and degenerative illnesses. This is particularly shown effective in treatments for chronic painful conditions especially with older animals. When a conventional treatment seems inadequate in alleviating the animal’s distress, Acupuncture may serve as supplementary measures in the animal’s medications. Initially, some Chinese herbs may be administered but the best of results are achieved when the needles have been inserted. Eventually, when the patient has positively responded to the acupuncture, the dosage of conventional drugs may already be lessened.

For pets or animals with acute conditions, acupuncture is needed to be performed one to two times within a week. Frequent sessions may give an unnecessary stress to the animal and may not give ample time for the animal to respond to the treatment. Upon the improvement of symptoms, the interval between treatment may be two to three weeks. And after full recovery, acupuncture may only be done for maintenance medications once in a month or season.